The visual language of Cristin Richard.

Metabolism II.

For Part II of the Metabolism trilogy, Cristin Richard has chosen to examine the question of the reflection, our own reflection in front of ourselves and the one that we later project onto the other: How our own subjectivity pushes us insidiously to construct a dangerous point of view arbitrarily of ourselves. And also how later this altered perception of ourselves could lead us to display a personality that is based on a biased judgment from our own part. Therefore, people in front of us perceive us as such. Does this affect our daily life? Could the fact that we build our own personality through the dialogue between our consciousness and our reflection distort our relationship with the world?

It seems that the mind makes it’s own decisions based upon a dialogue between two sides, by any means, it does seem that there is the self, and the reflection of the self. Each side is looking out of the other, and also the best interests for the sum of the two. As human beings, we all have an internal dialogue taking place. According to Freud, there are many facets to one’s personality. It’s almost a division of self. These different facets are only revealed when we encounter certain energies from certain people, or specific situations. It is intriguing that we unconsciously switch in and out of our personality traits.

To be closer to her topic, Cristin has worked with different sets of monozygotic twins. For weeks she met them at length and analyzed with them their sense of perception… perception of oneself…and that of the other… Are they not the perfect mirror of themselves? The mirror, an object which creates a dynamic: Proposing a reflection, a mirror possesses both an identity and the difference. It reveals a mismatch between the being and its’ representation. When the eye is captured and captivated by the mirror, the victim witnesses his power or distortion, making the mirror harmful while denouncinga certain perversity: Courtly love illusions, pride and vanity of Narcissus… [read more…]

The Space Between You and I.

The Space Between You and I (2016) Human Hair, Animal Tissue, Gold Leaf, Silicon, Matte Medium Photos by EE Berger

 
DSC_9825

DSC_9621

 

Metabolism.

Cristin Richard has chosen to present her new project, ‘Metabolism’, through an interdisciplinary approach which combines film, sound, installa­tion and performance. The artist proposes an in situ exhibition, in perfect harmony with the architecture it is housed within: The Historical Detroit Savings Bank magnificently built in 1927. At this moment, Cristin’s research and analysis on the human body brought her to explore the notion of time and its interdependence with the body and space. Which better than this particularly sound structure, for an odyssey in “space-time”.

Time, closely related to the sense of our existence, escapes any defini­tion. All attempts to define it includes a term that means time itself: “according to the order of becoming before and after” … “marked time by the succession of events (1.). If we try to express the main character of time, we will revert to talking about the notion of irreversibility, the act of falling in the past is impossible to correct, and in regret we face a shadow, an impregnable one of nothingness. The irreversible order of time is felt according to three dimensions: past, present and future. It is in the present that these three movements of conscience get material­ized: focus on the current existence, go back/return in thought to what was and no longer exists, and a perspective towards what will occur. But the present could be at its tum, lived and understood in various ways. Any fragment of becoming has a beginning already spent, and also not yet completed … It is in this context that Cristin wanted this exhibition designed, to allow the viewer to think of time from the pres­ent sense. The intuitions and the schematics imposed by our conscious­ness will be shaken, and our own subjective sensitivity to each is destabi­lized.  [read more..]

1. Nietzsche, Ainsi parlait Zarathoustra, Ed. Gallimard, 1947.

-Kenza Amrouk

 

Metabolism (2015) presented at The Historic Detroit Savings Bank. Performance in tandem with film.
Metabolism presented at The Historic Detroit Savings Bank.  Performance in tandem with film.

 

Metabolism Study.
(2015)
Metabolism Study. (2015)

 

Collaborative works of Simone Else and Cristin Richard presented at Metabolism, within the vault of The Historic Detroit Savings Bank.

 

 

 

 

Capsule Performance with Jacky O’Shaughnessy.

Jacky O’Shaughnessy performs for the opening of ‘Beneath the Skin’ at Outlet BK.
Jacky O'Shaughnessy performs for the opening of 'Beneath the Skin' at Outlet BK.

 

Capsule.

Capsule (2014) Studio view  Photograph by EE Berger
Capsule (2014)

 

Capsule (2014) Studio view Photograph by EE Berger
Capsule (2014)

 

Capsule (2014) Studio view Photograph by EE Berger
(2014)

 

Capsule (2014). Studio view Photograph by EE Berger
Capsule (2014).

Trifle III.

For her continuation of “Trifle”, Cristin Richard has chosen to deepen the discussion of over-consumption by focusing on, and analyzing the phenomenon of the fervent consumption of the image in our current day society.

The expansion of the capitalist economy involves the continual creation of ‘the lack’ and ‘the satisfaction’. ‘The satisfaction’ creates ‘the lack’ by calling up a new satisfaction, a vicious cycle of which we are imprisoned consumers.

The media commonly exists as a structure that belongs to the extension of our technical thought, and the use of the image is the most simple form to send through feelings of pleasure. Today, the reign of consumption and pleasure belongs to the image.

Nowadays, all areas of our society are affected by the phenomenon: Politics, Morality, Economics…  They are all about the image.  Will the picture become more important than the reality? Essentially, our everyday life is flooded by the image: TV, video, film and photography have become the main food sources of our mind. They dictate our feelings, our emotions, and push us into extreme stats of laziness. There is no more a need to exhaust ourselves on a physical or mental level…just one click, and everything is offered to us.

In front of the screen, the consumer is faced with a fast succession of rich images to absorb his consciousness and place him in a hypnotic state. He is then owned and manipulated by the images of entertainment and consumer goods, which only provides happiness to those who are profiting from things to be sold.

Trifle III. (2014)
Small collage series
Trifle III. (2014) Small collage series

Sculptural component of Trifle III. (2014).

Video component of Trifle III. (2014).

Performance of Trifle III. (2014)

Trifle III. (2014)
Performance Installation
CultureFix NYC
Photos by EE Berger
Trifle III. (2014) Performance Installation CultureFix NYC Photos by EE Berger

The Political Aesthetic of the Skin.

Live Performance Still
@Revolve’s Light Up Livernois Event 
Detroit
DDF_Cristin_Richard_01

 

Live Performance Still
Garnments made of animal intestines
dyed to match skin color of each performer
DDF_Cristin_Richard_07

 

Live Performance Still
DDF_Cristin_Richard_03

 

Live Performance Still
DDF_Cristin_Richard_06

 

Live Performance Still
DDF_Cristin_Richard_04

 

 

The Political Aesthetic of the Skin
Publication Photo by Manda Moran
kres

 

The Political Aesthetic of the Skin
Publication Photo by Manda Moran
Art Direction by Nate Czarling
c_richard

Untitled (Violin Piece).

Untitled (Violin Piece)
Carr Center
Detroit
image

 

Trifle.

Trifle I, 2013 are some pieces made by Richard after two months of residence at SIM Residency in Reykjavik, Iceland. Through this project, the artist has chosen to treat the phenomenon of over consumption in our society. With appropriating and diverting strong symbolic images of the consumer society, she criticizes the excesses of the latter: overproduction, junk, waste, North / South inequalities, body-worship and beauty.  Collage allows her to create a new world with elements of the existing world.  She returns the anomalies, while avoiding the lure of the aesthetic instrumentation of reality.

With the development, modernization and the enhancement of the populations of some countries beginning in the 1950’s,  people faced a profusion of products which led them in a downward spiral.  It pushed them to purchase products that they did not even need.  At this time, this frenetic consumption reflected the optimism and confidence in the future.  However, our way of living is taking more and more the form of an aggressive mass culture.  In this approach, consumption is no more for every individual the means to satisfy a need, but rather to be different.  In essence, this personalization tends to replace the real differences between contradictory individuals.

Jean Baudrillard condemns the increase in consumption by “artificial accelerators”(1),  such as accounting tools, psychological tools and sociological tools set up for the only purpose of increasing demand, while persuading consumers to respond to their deepest desires. The power of the consumer society is huge, it shapes and structures our brain according to the social and economic order of the contemporary world in which we live. It even takes the place of morality, where the body becomes an indispensable object. While advertising has often resorted to erotic figures, it is actually a censorship of our own fantasies. They are smothered by a set of codified sexual signs. We all have tendencies to over consume, but to each its own. The main goal is perhaps to fill a void…a void that terrifies the human, and in front of this feeling, he adopts impulsive behavior and excessive behavior…animal behavior, linked to a pure instinct of protection and survival.

To illustrate this animal instinct that the artist wishes to put forward in this project, the exhibition closes with Trifle II, 2013. This work is composed of a woman mounted against the wall.  She wears a garment of fur and intestinal linings to reference our tribal ancestors.  A pod sits atop of her head, like a tumorous growth that plagues our society. This sculptural installation is worn by the woman as she sits for hours in front the audience. Like in all her actions, Cristin Richard has developed a very elaborate plastic language: indeed the precise codification of the body’s movement trains as a whole beam of references and signs. Through this performance, the artist opens up the intimacy of her work to the viewer, which puts him in this form of correspondence described by Michel Foucault “It is a matter of coincidentally summoning the gaze of the other and that which one trains on oneself “(2).  When the viewer is faced with a human being within the sculpture in front of him, he immediately identifies with it.  He feels intrigued and uncomfortable.  He moves from contemplation to observation therefore wondering what he sees, trying to analyze and understand the universe in which he is involved in.

(1) Jean Baudrillard “La société de Consommation”, Idées Gallimard 1970  (2) Michel Foucault ‘L’écriture de soi” Revue Corp écrit, no 5: L’autoportrait, février 1983, pp.3-23

 

Curated by  Kenza Amrouk

 

« It is YOU I am  addressing because you are the ‘unit’ of my work l’AUTRE »  Gina Pane – Letter to a stranger, 1974

Performance in Detroit….

I was invited to present « Trifle II» 2013, within the same room of which a four course meal was served to Detroit area patrons and designers. Being that the piece criticizes consumption, I find it quite humorous to have had it installed amongst people who not only consume, but are also surrounded by the finest things on a daily basis. It was also interesting and constructive to observe the Detroit audience and compare it with the one from Reykjavik.  Icelandic viewers were more involved with the piece, they seemed intrigued about the choice of materials and the imagery used. American viewers appeared  to be more preoccupied with the performer, as if she were their entertainment. Is overconsumption a part of lifestyle influenced by the US citizens? Are Icelanders more sensitive to the questions relative to the overexploitation of natural resources? It is clear that this subject provoked some interesting reactions, which has inspired me to conduct further research on it.

-Cristin Richard

Trifle I. (Untitled)
Collage
approx 4′ x 6′

 

Trifle I. (Untitled)
Collage
11″ x 16″

 

Trifle I. (Untitled)
Collage
12″ x 15″

 

Trifle I. (Untitled)
Collage
14″ x 10″
Trifle I. (Untitled Collage)

 

Trifle I. (Untitled)
Collage
10″ x 13″
Trifle I. (Untitled Collage)

 

Trifle II.
Animal intestines, fur,
paper, acrylic, adhesive
Trifle II., (2013, Reykjavik)

 

Trifle II. (Performance Installation)
Kunstschlager, Reykjavik, Iceland
Trifle II., (2013, Reykjavik)

 

Trifle II. (Performance Installation)
CultureLab Event at Frontera
Detroit
Trifle II. (2013, Detroit)

 

 

 

InstallationView
SIM Gallery, Reykjavik, Iceland
Left: Animal intestine and fur garnment created for Trifle II. (Performance Installation),
Right: Trifle I. (Untitled), Collage on mirror
InstallationView SIM Gallery

 

Trifle I. (Untitled)
Collage on mirror

Daddy’s Girl.

For the Sweet Spot exhibition at Robert Kidd Gallery, Cristin Richard exhibited work in the form of sound sculpture.  With this particular piece, she recreates memory, capturing a beautiful moment leftover from a violent time.

The works of Cristin Richard oscillate between fragility and violence, between beauty and repulsion, between opacity and transparency and also between strength and lightness.  It explores our relationship to the body, relative to the most intimate fragments of the mind.

Daddy’s Girl
Hog intestine, resin, pigment
Daddy's Girl | 2012 | hog intestine, resin, pigment

 

The American Dream.

[…] At the time she first conceived this piece, Cristin Richard was questioning the concept of “the living”/ “the home” in society in general, and for the American society in particular. “Dwelling” is considered to be the essence of the human being, it means living in the world and thus fulfilling it’s citizen role, neighbor and host. The human must position oneself in front of existence and especially towards others. This is ethics: the quest for one’s position in the society.

A dwelling place could be of various kinds: house, apartment, home, guest house, houseboat, monastery, hut, tent or yurt in the desert, some shelter we built (1).  But it must be possible to close the door, “our door”; having an intimate space of retreat, respite, a break with the public space. Entering into his private space, the human being reaches the concept of reflection: a base to the relation to oneself, self-knowledge and self-preoccupation. This is the Ithaca of Ulysses (2), which relieves fatigue wanderings and struggles of daily life.

“Living” is also to be related to a place, a space, to fill it with yourself, not only as a material body.  A space marked by the print belonging to its inhabitants. The living space is colored by the subjectivity of it’s inhabitant, his vibrations, his memories and of his footprint.

Through “American Dream”, Cristin Richard offers the viewer to discover what was the home of her youth. Inside the Tee Pee, the artist recreates the protective walls that have rocked her childhood, we find all sorts of familiar objects. Memories that reflect are not only the good moments, but also those that carry the anxiety of confinement. Conceptually, this confinement relates to experiences that have shaped our childhood and hold us chained to some fears, an imperceptible depth of the being.  Everything is made to create a real interaction between the audience and this environment.

 Kenza Amrouk

(1) Martin Heidegger,  « Building, Dwelling, Thinking » Essays and lectures II, Gallimard, 1958.  1. Translation,  Albert Halstad, Harper.New York, 1971  (2) Homer “ The Odyssey” Translated by Robert Eagles – Introductions and notes by Bernard Know.  Published by the Penguin Group, 1997.

The American Dream
Public Pool
Hamtramck, MI
Animal intestines, acrylic, found objects
approx 12′ diameter x 8′ h.
The American Dream

 

The American Dream
Inside view
The American Dream | 2011 | Inside Detail

 

The American Dream
Archival Print
30″ x 20″
American Dream | 2012 | Photograph

 

The American Dream
Performance Installation
Birmingham, MI
The American Dream | 2012 | Performance Installation

 

The American Dream
Performance Installation
Birmingham, MI
The American Dream | 2012 | Performance Installation

 

 

 

 

Installation view
Pine Creek Center for the Arts
Rochester, MI
Leftovers | 2012 | Hog Casing, Pigment | Installation View

 

Leftovers
Hog Intestines, pigment, acrylic
Leftovers | 2012 | Hog Casing, Pigment

Leftovers.

Cristin Richard seizes her own fantasies and contradictions to bring the conscious sense to the viewer, pushing them to use their own intuition.  With “Leftovers”, she draws a metaphor of the ironic question about seduction between man and woman.

The word seduction stems from the Latin word “Sèducere”, which means to obtain favors from another. Rituals of seduction are universal, as are found in the world of plant, animal and human.  It must first attract the attention of the one it wants to conquer, the main goal is to take the emotional control and ensure a source of pleasure. In all species, it is the female who is the subject of seduction and the male who is the object.  For that women will enhance their physical charms to attract attention.  Women provoke, and men parade.  Then the dangerous game of attraction is engaged, the heady vortex, this struggle, this power dynamic, which only a part will be the winner.

“LEFTOVERS” will be displayed hanging from a string, spinning slowly as the carcass of an animal, a booty, the hunter’s trophy, who manages to build trust with his prey, then to dispose of her as he wishes …

The works of Cristin Richard oscillate between fragility and violence, between beauty and repulsion, between opacity and transparency and also between strength and lightness.  It explores our relationship to the body, relative to the most intimate fragments of the mind.

 Kenza Amrouk

Leftovers
Detroit Design Festival
Installation view at Frontera
Hog intestine, pigment, acrylic
Leftovers | 2012 | Detroit Design Festival

Lydie Vareihes wearing ‘Man’s Best Friend’
Photograph by Magali Magistry.
Rebirth | 2011 | photograph by Magali Magistry

 

Lydie Vareihes wearing ‘Man’s Best Friend’
Photograph by Magali Magistry.
Rebirth | 2011 | photograph by Magali Magistry

Domesticate Me.

“Domesticate Me”, the first exhibition in France of Cristin Richard, presented by La Découpe.

Using sculpture, Cristin Richard investigates a wide range of artistic, psychological and sociological topics.  Her works question identity, female sexuality and social standards.  Experimenting with colour, texture and transparency allows her to transform a repulsive material into something beautiful.  Her sculptures are often complex metaphors of women’s roles in society.  Some pieces can also be worn, which transforms the experience into a whole performance.  Furthermore, a unique performance was presented at the opening, in participation with Lydie Vareilhes, to music composed by Czarling.

For her exhibition at La Découpe, and after one month’s residence, the artist chose to introduce unique and original pieces, ironically questioning the duties of the housewife.  Her works, based around domestication of the female body in it’s interior, were presented in different rooms of the apartment/ gallery.

www.ladecoupe.org

Life Line
Hog intestines, resin, acrylic
Life Line

 

Tea for One
Hog intestines, resin, acrylic
Tea for One

 

Washed Up
Hog intestines, resin, acrylic
Washed Up

 

Wolf
Lamb intestines, resin, acrylic
5° CR  Wolf

 

Wolf (Detail of garder belt)
Lamb intestines, resin, acrylic
Wolf | Detail of Garder Belt

 

Left: Man’s Best Friend
Hog intestines, resin, acrylic
Right: From Dust to Dust (Vaccuum)
Hog intestines, resin, acrylic
CRichardVueexpo9-1

 

Performance Still
Lydie Vareilhes from Opera national de Paris
La Découpe, Paris, France
CRichardVueexpoPerf2

 

Photograph by Marvin Shaouni
Paper_Collection

Tribe.

New Moon
Toilet Paper, stiffening agent
New Moon

 

New Moon
Toilet Paper, stiffening agent
New Moon

 

Piki Girl
Toilet Paper, stiffening agent, pigment
_MG_1563

 

Kachina Doll
Toilet Paper, stiffening agent, pigment
Kachina Doll

 

Tokpela
Toilet Paper, stiffening agent, pigment
Tokpela

 

Touch of Muyingwa
Toilet paper, stiffening agent, pigment
Touch of Muyingwa

Head piece worn by Diana Rudenok
Photograph by EE Berger.
horns

 

Head piece worn by Diana Rudenok
Photograph by EE Berger.
headpiece

 

Elizabeth Butters wearing hog intestine garnment.
Photograph by EE Berger.
Time Traveler

 

Elizabeth Butters wearing hog intestine garnment.
Pictured in Richard’s former studio.
Photograph by EE Berger.
Time Traveler

 

 

 

 

 

Imelda Marcos.

Imelda Marcos
women’s size 5
hog intestine, resin, acrylic

Ripe for the Picking.

Ripe For The Picking
Outdoor Installation, Detroit
Hog intestines, resin, existing rose bushes
approx 20′ x 15′ x 10′
Ripe For The Picking

Support Group.

Support Group
hog intestines, resin, acrylic, velvet, wood, plexi
30″ x 20″
Support Group

Photograph by EE Berger.
Parasitic

 

Photograph by EE Berger.
Parasitic

 

Photograph by EE Berger.
Parasitic

 

 

Photograph by EE Berger.
Obscured Thoughts

 

Photograph by EE Berger.
Obscured Thoughts

 

La Pieta
Photograph by Joshua Band
Pieta

 

La Pieta
Photograph by Joshua Band
Pieta

Centerfold.

Centerfold
Hog Intestines, resin, acrylic, pigment, wood
Approx 9′ h.
Centerfold

Finge Festival, Music Hall, Detroit
Models wearing hog intestine garments

Playmates.

Playmates
Installation view at Robert Kidd Gallery
Birmingham, MI
Hog intestines, resin, acrylic, pigment

Understudy.

Understudy
Hog intestines, resin, pigment, acrylic
approx 4′ h.
Understudy

Late Bloomer.

Notion Detail
Hog intestine, resin, acrylic
NotionDetail

 

Late Bloomer #1/3
Hog intestine, resin, acrylic, pigment
approx 4’6″ h.
lateBlo

 

Late Bloomer #1/3
Material detail
Late Bloomer | 2005 | Detail

  

webcover2

Early Works.

Installation View
District Arts Gallery
Birmingham, MI
Hog intestines, acrylic
(2004)

 

Bitch
Hog intestines, acrylic
Animal Intestines, Acrylic Medium

 

Happy Homemaker
Hog intestines, acrylic
Happy Homemaker (2004)

 

Vixen
Hog intestines, acrylic
Animal Intestines, Acrylic Medium

 

Like A Virgin
Hog intestines, acryilc
Animal Intestines, Acryilc Medium

 

Woman On Top
Hog intestines, acryilc
Woman On Top

 

Trophy
Hog intestines, acryilc
Trophy (front view)